primadonna-grrrl

thinksquad:

African-American actress Danièle Watts claims she was “handcuffed and detained” by police officers from the Studio City Police Department in Los Angeles on Thursday after allegedly being mistaken for a prostitute.

According to accounts by Watts and her husband Brian James Lucas, two police officers mistook the couple for a prostitute and client when they were seen showing affection in public. When the officers asked Watts to produce a photo ID when questioned, she refused. Watts was subsequently handcuffed and placed in the back of a police cruiser while the officers attempted to figure out who she was. The two officers released Watts shortly afterwards.

Watts, who played CoCo in Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained and currently stars in Martin Lawrence vehicle Partners, posted an account of the incident on her Facebook page:

Watt’s husband Brian Lucas, who is white, claimed that the two were targeted by police for being an interracial couple. In a seperate post on his Facebook page, Lucas said that “from the questions that [police] asked me as D was already on her phone with her dad, I could tell that whoever called on us (including the officers), saw a tatted RAWKer white boy and a hot bootie shorted black girl and thought we were a HO (prostitute) & a TRICK (client).”

An Los Angeles PD public information officer told Variety that “there was no record of the incident as Watts wasn’t arrested or brought into the station for questioning.”

Sadly, this isn’t the first time something like this has happened. In 2008, a Galveston, Texas couple sued three police officers who arrested and beat their 12-year-old daughter after mistaking her for a prostitute.

http://mic.com/articles/98826/lapd-confuses-black-actress-kissing-white-husband-for-prostitute

emptyheartsonfire
I feel like my past is interfering with my present and there’s nothing I can actually do. I feel there’s just nothing. I’m unable to think clearly and I’m clearly unable to not let things affect me. Unable to force my brain to function, unable to just get to feel calmer in some way. I need some peace of mind and I need you to be here. I hate needing anything and yet I do […]
Simone de Beauvoir, from a letter to Jean-Paul Sartre (via violentwavesofemotion)
asylum-art

asylum-art:

Eduardo Rodriguez Calzado: Harmonic Images of Life and Consciousness 

Artist on Tumblr, on deviantART

With the use of bright colors, geometric shapes, dashes and dots I create extraordinary abstract imagery. I have been a painter for most of my life, taking painting classes from a very young age, but it wasn’t until recently that I started expressing myself through my artwork.

I am an artist obsessed with detail, expressing emotions through the fragmentation of color, capturing a great light in my artwork. In most of my paintings I represent the human form or some sort of human element and our connection to another plane of consciousness . In my process of painting, I sometimes have a very clear image of what I want to represent, they are images that pop into my head, and that is what I put down on canvas. At other times I just work from a feeling and start putting forms and colors down and later I look at it and find the story I want to tell.


fullten

tw-koreanhistory:

Gone In 41 Seconds — Police Quick to Kill Korean Artist

Feb 24, 2008

LA HABRA, Calif. — On the afternoon of December 31, 2007, two police officers encountered Michael Cho in the parking lot of a liquor store in La Habra, a small, generally quiet city in Orange County, California. It didn’t take long for the meeting to go bad. After less than a minute the officers unleashed a barrage of bullets on the 25-year-old artist, ending his life - and setting off an ongoing cascade of protests across Southern California’s Korean American community.

Computerized police logs obtained by New America Media suggest the officers quickly turned to deadly force when they confronted Cho, whom they suspected of vandalism. According to the Computer Automated Transcript documenting the incident, at 2:04 p.m. the cops contacted their dispatcher to say they’d located Cho. “Out with the subject near the liquor store,” the transcript reads. Just 41 seconds later they radioed dispatch again, this time saying they’d shot the suspect and now needed paramedics to attend to him. “Shot fired, Suspect down, Medics requested,” reads the transcript. In the aftermath of the killing, Cho’s family has publicly condemned the department, saying the officers rushed to shoot Cho, rather than using less lethal tools like pepper spray or Taser stun guns to subdue him.

“The police killed my son like a dog,” Cho’s mother, Honglan Cho, recently told the La Habra City Council. According to Shelly Lynn Kaufman, an attorney for the Cho family, the fusillade of bullets left ten holes in his body.

Read More: http://news.newamericamedia.org/news/view_article.html?article_id=ad58d8b8031a47854d3676200f5c5be5